Focus on Parish Communications

When Baptist minister Peter Baker wants to shut down a conversation quickly, he tells people he’s a Minister of Religion. But more frequently when asked his occupation he replies, ‘I’m in the communications industry’, adeptly summarising a primary purpose of the Church.

‘We’re here to get a message across,’ he writes in a guest blog, ‘God’s message — the most important message ever. For the God of Christian faith is in the communications business. And that means we have to communicate His truth with clarity, creativity and conviction.’

So often in the busyness of parish life, we overlook so many of the ways in which we are communicating — for better or worse — the vitality of our faith and our God of creation.

Communication is at the heart of our vision of God — from God’s self-communication in Jesus as his Word incarnate, to the written Gospel and the Church’s spreading of the Good News through proclamation and mission. And more than this, just as God took on human flesh to join our conversations, the Church is in the business of communicating in ways that are culturally relevant.

And yet so often in the busyness of parish life, we overlook so many of the ways in which we are communicating — for better or worse — the vitality of our faith and our God of creation.

If you are reading this and have the daunting image in your mind of an unkempt noticeboard, or a website that might have been created in the 1990s, do not fear! Why not pick up a copy of Neil Pugmire’s 100 Ways to Get Your Church Noticed? It’s not an in-depth ‘How To’ but it will give you a wealth of ideas and tips to get you started.

Dona McCullagh, Ridley’s Communications Officer, is also Churchwarden of Caldecote and Childerley, where she brings many of her design and communications skills to bear in the local parish context.

Focus on Parish Communications

When Baptist minister Peter Baker wants to shut down a conversation quickly, he tells people he’s a Minister of Religion. But more frequently when asked his occupation he replies, ‘I’m in the communications industry’, adeptly summarising a primary purpose of the Church.

‘We’re here to get a message across,’ he writes in a guest blog, ‘God’s message — the most important message ever. For the God of Christian faith is in the communications business. And that means we have to communicate His truth with clarity, creativity and conviction.’

So often in the busyness of parish life, we overlook so many of the ways in which we are communicating — for better or worse — the vitality of our faith and our God of creation.

Communication is at the heart of our vision of God — from God’s self-communication in Jesus as his Word incarnate, to the written Gospel and the Church’s spreading of the Good News through proclamation and mission. And more than this, just as God took on human flesh to join our conversations, the Church is in the business of communicating in ways that are culturally relevant.

And yet so often in the busyness of parish life, we overlook so many of the ways in which we are communicating — for better or worse — the vitality of our faith and our God of creation.

If you are reading this and have the daunting image in your mind of an unkempt noticeboard, or a website that might have been created in the 1990s, do not fear! Why not pick up a copy of Neil Pugmire’s 100 Ways to Get Your Church Noticed? It’s not an in-depth ‘How To’ but it will give you a wealth of ideas and tips to get you started.

Dona McCullagh, Ridley’s Communications Officer, is also Churchwarden of Caldecote and Childerley, where she brings many of her design and communications skills to bear in the local parish context.