Newly Appointed Mission Theologian

A former Ridleian (1978-80), the Rt Revd Dr Graham Kings, currently Bishop of Sherborne, has been appointed Mission Theologian in the Anglican Communion from July 2015.

 After serving his title, Graham worked as a theological educator with the Church Mission Society in Kenya for 6 years, at what is now the St Andrew’s Theological College in Kabare. He returned to the UK as Lecturer in Mission Studies in the Cambridge Theological Federation, and was the first director of the Henry Martyn Centre [now Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide], one of the member institutes of the Federation.

Graham KingsIn this new role, Graham will travel widely in the Communion, encouraging and stimulating theological research with a special emphasis on insights from Africa, Asia and Latin America. He speaks of adding a fourth voice to the three named by Henry Venn in the 19th century: ‘self-supporting, self-governing and self-extending churches’. This is the ‘self-theologising’ voice, a key element of which involves convening a seminars in Anglican Communion Studies for theologians, leading to future publication.

Newly Appointed Mission Theologian

A former Ridleian (1978-80), the Rt Revd Dr Graham Kings, currently Bishop of Sherborne, has been appointed Mission Theologian in the Anglican Communion from July 2015.

 After serving his title, Graham worked as a theological educator with the Church Mission Society in Kenya for 6 years, at what is now the St Andrew’s Theological College in Kabare. He returned to the UK as Lecturer in Mission Studies in the Cambridge Theological Federation, and was the first director of the Henry Martyn Centre [now Cambridge Centre for Christianity Worldwide], one of the member institutes of the Federation.

Graham KingsIn this new role, Graham will travel widely in the Communion, encouraging and stimulating theological research with a special emphasis on insights from Africa, Asia and Latin America. He speaks of adding a fourth voice to the three named by Henry Venn in the 19th century: ‘self-supporting, self-governing and self-extending churches’. This is the ‘self-theologising’ voice, a key element of which involves convening a seminars in Anglican Communion Studies for theologians, leading to future publication.