Robert Evans

Research Topic: Christian theology and the writing of history in the Carolingian Empire, c.700-900 A.D.

Robert EvansMy doctoral work focuses on the Carolingian Empire, a Christian Empire which stretched across western Europe in the eighth and ninth-centuries. Both the rulers and thinkers of this Empire we deeply conscious of God’s government of their (often chaotic) world. I study  Carolingian historians’ attempts to write chronicles, epic poems, biographies etc. within a Christian framework. Although these histories were often politically charged, they were also rich in theological reflection. This reflection could be the celebration of God-given triumph or the struggle to see God at work during bitter civil war or devastating Viking raids. I hope to demonstrate the vibrancy with which these men and women understood their world in a Christian way.

God and His Word were of central importance to the Carolingians. Carolingian rulers, such as the Emperor Charlemagne, presided over wide-ranging Christian reforms and missionary activity in Germany, Scandinavia and eastern Europe. This alone should recommend it as a key period in Christian history, despite its previous neglect by theologians.

I have been drawn to historians and chroniclers because they grapple honestly with how to tell their stories within a Christian framework. I am constantly struck by their acknowledgement of God’s role in victory or defeat, in the everyday or at the heights of political intrigue.

More specifically, I have been drawn to historians and chroniclers because they grapple honestly with how to tell their stories within a Christian framework. I am constantly struck by their acknowledgement of God’s role in victory or defeat, in the everyday or at the heights of political intrigue. Although they express themselves very differently from modern Christians, I believe there is much to explore in how we ourselves reflect on God’s role in the recent past. 

Visit Robert's Academia.edu page

Robert Evans

Research Topic: Christian theology and the writing of history in the Carolingian Empire, c.700-900 A.D.

Robert EvansMy doctoral work focuses on the Carolingian Empire, a Christian Empire which stretched across western Europe in the eighth and ninth-centuries. Both the rulers and thinkers of this Empire we deeply conscious of God’s government of their (often chaotic) world. I study  Carolingian historians’ attempts to write chronicles, epic poems, biographies etc. within a Christian framework. Although these histories were often politically charged, they were also rich in theological reflection. This reflection could be the celebration of God-given triumph or the struggle to see God at work during bitter civil war or devastating Viking raids. I hope to demonstrate the vibrancy with which these men and women understood their world in a Christian way.

God and His Word were of central importance to the Carolingians. Carolingian rulers, such as the Emperor Charlemagne, presided over wide-ranging Christian reforms and missionary activity in Germany, Scandinavia and eastern Europe. This alone should recommend it as a key period in Christian history, despite its previous neglect by theologians.

I have been drawn to historians and chroniclers because they grapple honestly with how to tell their stories within a Christian framework. I am constantly struck by their acknowledgement of God’s role in victory or defeat, in the everyday or at the heights of political intrigue.

More specifically, I have been drawn to historians and chroniclers because they grapple honestly with how to tell their stories within a Christian framework. I am constantly struck by their acknowledgement of God’s role in victory or defeat, in the everyday or at the heights of political intrigue. Although they express themselves very differently from modern Christians, I believe there is much to explore in how we ourselves reflect on God’s role in the recent past. 

Visit Robert's Academia.edu page