Emma Jamieson

Research Topic: Educating Girls: The Role of the Anglican Church in the Education of Women in East Africa

Emma JamiesonThe potential for girls to contribute significantly to ending poverty for themselves, their families, their communities, their countries, and the world is being widely recognised as ‘the girl effect’. There has been a shift in the last decade or so to focus on girls in developing countries as a means to alleviate poverty. However, there appears to be a distinct voice lacking in the conversation, and that is the voice of the church, including the Anglican Church The premise of 'the girl effect’ is essentially as follows: to educate girls will give them an opportunity to escape things such as prostitution, maternal mortality, sex trafficking, female genital mutilation, and other forms of injustice. Empowering women has the potential to change entire communities and even nations.

In the Anglican church discussions about the role of women are often limited to the ordination of women as priests, or conversations about women bishops. I believe there is scope to broaden our perspective substantially. I feel challenged to consider ‘the girl effect’ from a theological viewpoint. I am interested particularly in the region of East Africa and considering the ways in which this notion of empowering women has impacted, if at all, women there.

I believe there is scope to broaden our perspective substantially. I feel challenged to consider ‘the girl effect’ from a theological viewpoint.

I would also like to examine the ways in which the Anglican Church adds to this, either positively or negatively; and whether the church contributes to the education of girls and the impact this has. I would like to research into ways the historically patriarchal structure of the church, both in East Africa and in the West, has potentially impacted the way gender is understood in East Africa and the role the Western church has to play in the gender issue beyond its own parameters.

Emma Jamieson

Research Topic: Educating Girls: The Role of the Anglican Church in the Education of Women in East Africa

Emma JamiesonThe potential for girls to contribute significantly to ending poverty for themselves, their families, their communities, their countries, and the world is being widely recognised as ‘the girl effect’. There has been a shift in the last decade or so to focus on girls in developing countries as a means to alleviate poverty. However, there appears to be a distinct voice lacking in the conversation, and that is the voice of the church, including the Anglican Church The premise of 'the girl effect’ is essentially as follows: to educate girls will give them an opportunity to escape things such as prostitution, maternal mortality, sex trafficking, female genital mutilation, and other forms of injustice. Empowering women has the potential to change entire communities and even nations.

In the Anglican church discussions about the role of women are often limited to the ordination of women as priests, or conversations about women bishops. I believe there is scope to broaden our perspective substantially. I feel challenged to consider ‘the girl effect’ from a theological viewpoint. I am interested particularly in the region of East Africa and considering the ways in which this notion of empowering women has impacted, if at all, women there.

I believe there is scope to broaden our perspective substantially. I feel challenged to consider ‘the girl effect’ from a theological viewpoint.

I would also like to examine the ways in which the Anglican Church adds to this, either positively or negatively; and whether the church contributes to the education of girls and the impact this has. I would like to research into ways the historically patriarchal structure of the church, both in East Africa and in the West, has potentially impacted the way gender is understood in East Africa and the role the Western church has to play in the gender issue beyond its own parameters.